Nathan’s Notes

November 4, 2019

Welcome to Nathan’s Notes, your monthly report from middle school! Each month I’ll share some moments from the classroom, curriculum thoughts from me and/or our amazing teachers, some ideas about education that I’m excited about, and more.

One thing that got me excited this month…

Janis Chun’s 5th-grade science class. The students were using ratio tables in conjunction with Google Maps to discover how eating different foods change the carbon footprint. The students collaborated in pairs as they used math, technology, and science concepts to create a poster that highlighted their findings. I loved how the kids were able to have an application of math to deepen their understanding of a real-world issue about the environment. They were able to work on collaboration skills while using technology in a thoughtful way. Most importantly, the kids were engaged and excited about what they were doing in class!

A curricular question I’m pondering is…

How we can continue to build confident math students? The other day I heard one of our teachers say, “I am not a math person.” Immediately after she said it, she recognized that this statement is something that we have been actively working to vanquish from our language at Prospect Sierra. A growth mindset, especially in math education, is a topic we have discussed regularly by sharing our own personal math stories. Many of the stories that exist within our educational community are of struggle, self-doubt, and external factors that took away our math confidence. We understand that these are the kinds of experiences that lead towards the declaration of believing one is a “math person” or not. For the past few years, the math department has been working hard to unpack not just personal stories of discouragement in someone’s math journey, but also discussing how larger movements of math education in our country have contributed to self-doubt in this subject. How do we continue to foster confident math students? How do our own math journeys as adults impact our children’s experience in math?

One moment that made me think, wow what a special community this is…

When I spoke to the students from the “Be the Change” elective about the climate strike. To be honest, I was worried about this day. How do I support student activism while still upholding the integrity of the middle school? In this case, the activism the kids wanted to take directly impacted school because it required them to miss school. This question rattled in my mind. One day a group of 10 mixed-grade students appeared at my office door. They were from the “Be the Change” elective and were hoping to organize a Prospect Sierra group at the climate march in San Francisco. I wasn’t sure exactly what to say, but as we dove into dialogue it became clear to me that these students truly understood the tough situation that I was in as an administrator. They had empathy for me, and they also made clear that this was an event that they felt very passionate about. The way that these students engaged in discussion showed that they had been given a Prospect Sierra education. They spoke with empathy, respect, organization, and passion. We came to an agreement through thoughtful discussion, and we decided how to move forward. What initially felt like a stressful conundrum ended up being an inspiring moment.